On the Apollo 11 moon landing...



  • What with the 50th anniversary coming up next week, and the fact that I did a search and there's never been a TWS post about it before ...it behooves me to ask: what are your thoughts about the moon landing by Armstrong and co? Does it fill you with awe? Or are you not that bothered?

    If you're not that bothered, that's fine. For me, I think I've grown to appreciate the accomplishment more as I've got older. As a kid, I looked at the moon and it seemed deceptively easy, as if all you had to do was aim true and stop when you got there: I had no idea about trigonometry, or gravity, or the limited fuel available.

    But at the same time ...on a documentary I saw this week, there was auld Walter Kronkite getting genuinely choked-up, and using the same hyperbolic superlatives I'd use if I saw, say, Jesus or Dr Manhattan. I tend to stop just short of that level of hype, but if you feel it? Tell me about your awe.

    I know the Moon is a profound thing. No one's ever really explained to me why we only have one moon instead of many, or why, from our perspective, it's the same size in our sky (more or less) as the Sun, which is massively bigger scale-wise. Seems like a weird, just-so arrangement.

    Do you think society would have been do impressed if Apollo 11 had only visited, say, one of ten moons in our orbit?

    I should say, by the way, that I don't subscribe to any conspiracy theories that say we never went there. Years ago, I read 'Dark Moon' by David S Percy (the definitive Moon Hoax book), but none of the facts stayed in my brain, so they can't have been very convincing (?)

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  • @Indrid-Cold Idk how can someone not be in awe about it but I'm definitely NOT one of those. I guess by far the most fascinating topic to ever exist in the universe is the Universe. About Apollo 11, I still remember Armstrong's words,"That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." It truly was a remarkable and a turning event for all the space explorations that followed and opened up the giant box for discoveries. Alas I wasn't born when it was launched but I do remember seeing a documentary based on it and to say that people were abuzz would be an understatement but TBT who wouldn't be that way If I could get to watch the first step taken by Armstrong on the moon LIVE then I would surely go bizzare! The thing that amazes me about the Universe is that even if we've come so far with all the sci-tech inventions and discoveries we know Oh so little. Its like a big giant matrix you think you know all but what you've found is a tiny little speck! I swear if I grow up to have sufficient amount of money in the future I would definitely go on to a space tour to experience that awe, provided that I have money and someone to take me up there (I know I deviated off the topic but thats all I have to offer at present)





  • @petrapark3r 😂😂



  • @Indrid-Cold said in On the Apollo 11 moon landing...:

    If you're not that bothered, that's fine. For me, I think I've grown to appreciate the accomplishment more as I've got older. As a kid, I looked at the moon and it seemed deceptively easy, as if all you had to do was aim true and stop when you got there: I had no idea about trigonometry, or gravity, or the limited fuel available.

    It does fill me with awe. I mean I've been thinking if investing those billions in health care for people might have been a better idea. But then again, it is incredibly inspirational for people that we have made a real first step into space, a sign that science really works. It is awe inspiring. And I think we shouldn't stop there.

    I know the Moon is a profound thing. No one's ever really explained to me why we only have one moon instead of many, or why, from our perspective, it's the same size in our sky (more or less) as the Sun, which is massively bigger scale-wise. Seems like a weird, just-so arrangement.

    The moon is (prolly) the result of the collision of a small planet with earth. The fact that we have only one has to do with earth's size and weight. And it's very close, like if you hold your hand directly in front of your eye it's also bigger than any skyscraper around. But maybe explaining it was stupid of me, cause it takes away a bit of the awe innit? :yum:

    Do you think society would have been do impressed if Apollo 11 had only visited, say, one of ten moons in our orbit?

    Nope.

    I should say, by the way, that I don't subscribe to any conspiracy theories that say we never went there. Years ago, I read 'Dark Moon' by David S Percy (the definitive Moon Hoax book), but none of the facts stayed in my brain, so they can't have been very convincing (?)

    There were 13 moonlandings by now. And everybody only ever cares about the first.



  • @Anastasia-Smith Of all my mates, you're the only one who says they'd sign up for space tourism. So cool. I agree with every word you wrote.



  • @petrapark3r Buzz. What I guy. 'Magnificent Desolation': what a book. And as a guy who enjoys a (makes drinky-drinky gesture) myself, I can appreciate the moon landing fallout.






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