@Kana said in If you were offered immortality with youth, would you take it?: Why does it sound like you mean love cannot be without sacrifice. That's sentimental talk imo. It sounds like that, because that is what I truly believe. I mean I obviously know you can have positive feelings toward another and wish him well. But I believe that this in not truly love. My father always had this kind of attitude for me, but if he would have had to renounce on something he wanted to give me what I wanted, I sure as hell wouldn't get a cent. Maybe I do see it this way, because I have experienced what is no love. How i see it: you care; you work for betterment. We don't need big sacrifices here do we? I would call work a sacrifice unless working makes you feel good all the time (or alternatively unless work is your kind of drug). For me work can be hard sometimes, even if it is rewarding. I think it's joyful that the mother can stay with her child forever if they both wish for that. Nothing to say against that. Just saying something that costs you has more value, that's all. Isn't that the definition of "value", that it "costs"? I think immortality definitely makes life less meaningful. Depends on what we choose to make of our time. It has infinite potential for growth and also for detriment. What you say is true. Just saying, limited time is even more valueable and meaningful, than unlimited. Somewhat like money: If you have 1.000.000$ it doesn't matter that you buy a new CD player and don't ever use it. You just don't worry about it and get on with your life. If however you only have 20$ you will damn well worry about that CD player, while you go hungry...